What is an abiotic factor?

What is an abiotic? An abiotic factor are things that can affect living organisms or life on earth but they are not living things themselves. Examples of abiotic are wind, temperature, rainfall, pressure and humidity. Abiotic or abiotic factors can be termed as non living materials or things

In biology, abiotic factors can include water, light, radiation, temperature, humidity, atmosphere, acidity, and soil. The macroscopic climate often influences each of the above. Pressure and sound waves may also be considered in the context of marine or sub-terrestrial environments. Abiotic factors in ocean environments also include aerial exposure, substrate, water clarity, solar energy and tides.

Consider the differences in the mechanics of C3, C4, and CAM plants in regulating the influx of carbon dioxide to the Calvin-Benson Cycle in relation to their abiotic stressors. C3 plants have no mechanisms to manage photorespiration, whereas C4 and CAM plants utilize a separate  enzyme to prevent photorespiration, thus increasing the yield of photosynthetic processes in certain high energy environments. Many require very high temperatures, pressures or unusual concentrations of chemical substances such as sulfur; this is due to their specialization into extreme conditions. In addition, fungi have also evolved to survive at the temperature, the humidity, and stability of their environment.[

h abiotic factor

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RINDER PESTS
. NEWCASTLE DISEASE
 BACTERIA DISEASES

 FUNGAL DISEASES

PROTOZOAN DISEASES
155. TRYPONOSOMIASIS
In biology, abiotic factors can include water, light, radiation, temperature, humidity, atmosphere, acidity, and soil. The macroscopic climate often influences each of the above. Pressure and sound waves may also be considered in the context of marine or sub-terrestrial environments. Abiotic factors in ocean environments also include aerial exposure, substrate, water clarity, solar energy and tides.Consider the differences in the mechanics of C3, C4, and CAM plants in regulating the influx of carbon dioxide to the Calvin-Benson Cycle in relation to their abiotic stressors.

C3 plants have no mechanisms to manage photorespiration, whereas C4 and CAM plants utilize a separate  enzyme to prevent photorespiration, thus increasing the yield of photosynthetic processes in certain high energy environments. Many require very high temperatures, pressures or unusual concentrations of chemical substances such as sulfur; this is due to their specialization into extreme conditions. In addition, fungi have also evolved to survive at the temperature, the humidity, and stability of their environment.[

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